100 years ago, Tibbetts Brook meandered it's way through the Bronx wetlands, sustaining an enormous ecosystem on the edge of the booming industry of Manhattan.

As the city began to stretch and grow, development was planned to the North and the wetlands were paved over. Water flowing into the estuary was dammed in Van Cortlandt Lake, and Tibbetts Brook was buried into the Broadway sewer. Today, this "simple solution" has become the leading cause of pollution in the Harlem River due to sewer overflow.  In addition to water pollution, flooding plagues Marble Hill and the neighborhoods surrounding Van Cortlandt Park, further splintered by a century of poor urban planning which has fractured and isolated this area of the Bronx.

This summer, City as Living Laboratory is calling attention to a solution, collaborating with SLO Architecture and Bob Braine to launch Finding Tibbetts and Estuary Tattoos, the first two projects in Daylighting Tibbetts Brook, a constellation of artist-led initiatives to help engage the public and envision the future of Tibbetts Brook.

You're invited to take part. 

  Tibbetts Brook currently enters the Broadway Sewer here, at the corner of Van Cortlandt Lake

Tibbetts Brook currently enters the Broadway Sewer here, at the corner of Van Cortlandt Lake