Uncover the potential of unearthing Tibbetts Brook
with City as Living Laboratory's Spring Appeal

 

#FindingTibbetts

 
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100 years ago, Tibbetts Brook meandered it's way through the Bronx wetlands, sustaining an enormous ecosystem on the edge of the booming industry of Manhattan.

As the city began to stretch and grow, development was planned to the North and the wetlands were paved over. Water flowing into the estuary was dammed in Van Cortlandt Lake, and Tibbetts Brook was buried into the Broadway sewer. Today, this "simple solution" has become the leading cause of pollution in the Harlem River due to sewer overflow.  In addition to water pollution, flooding plagues Marble Hill and the neighborhoods surrounding Van Cortlandt Park, further splintered by a century of poor urban planning which has fractured and isolated this area of the Bronx.

This summer, City as Living Laboratory is calling attention to a solution, collaborating with SLO Architecture and Bob Braine to launch Finding Tibbetts and Estuary Tattoos, the first two projects in Daylighting Tibbetts Brook, a constellation of artist-led initiatives to help engage the public and envision the future of Tibbetts Brook.

You're invited to take part. 

  Tibbetts Brook currently enters the Broadway Sewer here, at the corner of Van Cortlandt Lake

Tibbetts Brook currently enters the Broadway Sewer here, at the corner of Van Cortlandt Lake

  A map of the original trajectory of Tibbetts Brook, with a proposal for a new riverbed and locations of CALL events. 

A map of the original trajectory of Tibbetts Brook, with a proposal for a new riverbed and locations of CALL events. 

Ecological experts agree...

The best solution to stop combined sewer overflow from polluting the Harlem River is through "daylighting" Tibbetts Brook, which is the process of unearthing the river and re-directing it into a new stream, delivering fresh water directly into the Harlem River, bypassing the sewers and expensive water treatment. Daylighting Tibbetts Brook will create a beautiful new linear park, allow neighborhoods to reconnect and help to restore the integrity of the waterways. CALL's 2018 projects will help residents envision a way forward for Tibbetts Brook. 

Finding Tibbetts, a mobile model wetlands by SLO Architecture, will demonstrate a better future for the Bronx as it travels from neighborhood to neighborhood. Residents who interact with it will learn about the ecology of the area as they imagine what Tibbetts Brook might look like running above ground along a new riverbed.  Estuary Tattoos by Bob Braine,will trace the history of the wetlands onto the skin of local residents through temporary body painting, viscerally connecting people with the ecosystem that surrounds them by mapping the course of the water's history. 

Through connecting  local residents to the history and future of Tibbetts Brook and  the Bronx wetlands over a series of six public events, CALL will raise awareness about this pivotal issue by gathering input from other local advocacy groups and community stakeholders. 

In supporting this initiative, you lay the groundwork for the future of New York City's waterways.

 
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How You Can Help

CALL aims to raise $25,000. This will be matched by a grant to fund Finding Tibbetts and Estuary Tattoos.

Your contribution will help pay for

  • Skills and materials needed to construct and transport Finding Tibbetts
  • Materials for Estuary Tattoos
  • Resources to host 5-6 community events, advocating for the daylighting of Tibbetts Brook

CALL thanks you for your support; you contribution will have a huge impact on the scope of our events and the number of people CALL is able to reach. 

Choose how you want to contribute

 

The slide shows to the right illustrate conceptual plans for Finding Tibbetts and Estuary Tattoos.